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The Guy Finding Out About Gangs And Stuff

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  • The Guy Finding Out About Gangs And Stuff

    t.v. is great at the moment when i see it...that there vandels thing was on a few days ago...now i saw most of a thing about gang culture....i agree with what it said about it being a big problem ,i just remember some the ppl you see when going around london..or even wellingborough....even where i live i know there are gangs...and when i was younger i knew names and knew of alot of the trouble.....coz i was a bit of baskteballer i avoided getting into alot of that stuff because of who i was with....but knew ppl who got seriously hurt....deja vu..."this country going crapper"

    boeh....i prefer the happy thought...blocking al the bad stuff out is good...but unfortunatly ostrich syndrone doesn't protect you.

    buffy was good though.

  • #2
    I saw that prog about the gangs, vernon. Scary or what? I really felt for that mother whose son had been threatened so she moved him away and then her second son was threatened with a gun! I thought things were bad around my way, but it's disneyland compared to some of those places!



    And did you notice how people were saying the government didn't want to know? Absolutely typical. Politicians don't have to live among this riff raff. It's about time people started telling their MP's to get something done about such things.



    Misty
    "Almost anything you do will seem insignificant, but it is very important that you do it. You must be the change that you wish to see in the world." Gandhi

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    • #3
      >>. It's about time people started telling their MP's to get something done about such things.

      Comment


      • #4
        excellent for lining the bottom of waste bags to absorb those smelly drips.[/b]


        Roflmao



        I've written over the years to my MP and give her her due, she has tried to get things done. She's arranged a number of meeting with police, housing, public. She even got us a meeting with the Chief Constable one time. For all the good it did, she might as well have not bothered.



        We got the usual platitudes - it won't happe overnight, we've got as many men on the beat as possible, blah, blah, blah. The CC refused a seat behind a table because he said 'it would put a barrier between us' I wonder what he thought his uniform did? Yes, he has a degree in psychology



        Misty
        "Almost anything you do will seem insignificant, but it is very important that you do it. You must be the change that you wish to see in the world." Gandhi

        Comment


        • #5
          I was just thinking about this very thing answering a post from Jeannie!!

          Our MP is interested in things so totally out of his remit he should change jobs and be the TV presenter he so obviously wants to be. I hear him on our local radio sometimes and think Wha??? How about getting on with things in this neck of the woods for a change?



          Shall I write and say just that?

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          • #6
            Vernon I love your way with words, lol
            long fluffy wibbley bits (not)[/b]
            Thanks for the reminder of the prog, I've got it on video and when I've got a moment on Weds I'll sit down and watch it properly as it sounds really educational.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by spinkysay@Jun 9 2003, 5:03 PM

              I was just thinking about this very thing answering a post from Jeannie!!

              Our MP is interested in things so totally out of his remit he should change jobs and be the TV presenter he so obviously wants to be. I hear him on our local radio sometimes and think Wha??? How about getting on with things in this neck of the woods for a change?



              Shall I write and say just that?
              he should change jobs and be the TV presenter he so obviously wants to be. I hear him on our local radio sometimes and think Wha??? How about getting on with things in this neck of the woods for a change?[/QUOTE/]I think it should be a requirement that an MP:



              Live in their constituency - not just hold a surgery in some tiny little office somewhere - usually more inaccessible than the majority of polling stations. Live in it - so they get to listen to fireworks from May thru the following January. Hear the yapping dogs, the obscenities the kids yell. Get dive-bombed by the RAF/local flying school. Get pigeon cr*p all over their laundry. Cement dust in their Oxford marmalade, falling out of their briefcase at the Commons. Have the local dealers parking outside their houses with their in-car systems advertising their presence. The prospect of a new London airport in thier backyard - like it or not. Lose the railway that is so handy for nipping up to town.



              Tour their constituency (unannounced, at all times of day including evenings) at a max speed of 10mph in 'problem' residential areas - so they get long enough to see what is actually going on in the streets - fortnightly (preferably weekly, but given the fact that parliamentary hours are still so 'men's club' (despite Labour's 'commitment' to making Parliament more accessible, working hours-wise to women, given that although equal we still have to have the kids. Never heard any more about that did we??) that time would not allow for that. So that even if they did - as they would - live in the 'better end' of their patch, they would still have a true idea of what the people they represent put up with. They would also save time on surgeries as they would already be aware of the problems their constituents normally take to them there.

              Just a letter/mail/call telling them to look out for XXXX when next they passed YYYY would be sufficient.



              Visit each primary/middle/high state school at least once a year - unannounced. Hear for themselves the racket that makes one think one is passing at a break time - when in fact, lessons are supposedly in session. Be invited to stand where the bucket usually does on a rainy day . . . .



              I can hear the 'blah blah blah' about limited time/security and all that - but congressmen manage it despite higher population and legal firearms. Tisn't a case of can't - it's won't. A few less formal dinners and pointless opening ceremonies and the like - more use of video conferencing etc. for the background work (a lot of the minor parliamentary debates could be done like that too - but of course, they prefer the subsidised booze and food at the Commons, as well as the media opportunities) and I think a fair amount of time would be freed up . . . so they might actually have some idea of what goes on in the place they supposedly represent.



              Why should people who don't have access to chauffeured cars/expense-account travel etc. have to struggle up to London to 'lobby' their MP in a huge noisy hall where not a word can be heard? That is why the turn out for so many 'lobbies' on so many issues is so poor - not because no one cares, but because the time, expense and sheer difficulty of travel - especially for the older/disabled/child-encumbered - make it impossible. Plus the media deliberately shoot these occasions in such a way as to make public attendance look other than it is - when I went up to lobby over the DDA, on television it looked as if there were only about 100 people there but in fact there were many times that number, despite the problems of travel.



              'Popular' or contoversial issues, on the other hand; a handful of noisy bannerwavers can look like a mob, especially when the occasion is filmed so as to include a lot of tourists/day-to-day passers-by in shot. People naturally turn to look at cameras - particularly when one of the tv crew suddenly yells through a loudhailer in order to attract attention - a crafty trick I have seen used more than once.





              QUOTE
              Shall I write and say just that? [/b]


              Why not? You have every right! After all, I doubt very much if his voters were actually attending the polling station just to give him a personal media platform; isn't the idea that as their elected representative, he should use that platform to air their views. ? Not to forward his own career.



              Anyone else remember the days before Thatcher made politicians so unpopular one could ask the copper on the door of No. 10 to bang on the door for you so a petition could be handed in? Now the end of the street looks like the gates of the Kremlin - during Stalin's reign.



              Tannasg

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              • #8
                Anyone else remember the days before Thatcher made politicians so unpopular one could ask the copper on the door of No. 10 to bang on the door for you so a petition could be handed in? Now the end of the street looks like the gates of the Kremlin - during Stalin's reign.[/b]


                I think that had more to do with possible terrorist activity than too keep the riff-raff away, although it serves that purpose just as well.



                When we have the revolution I want Tannasg to be in charge



                And yes, Spinky, write to your MP and say that. After all you're paying his flippin' salary!!



                Misty
                "Almost anything you do will seem insignificant, but it is very important that you do it. You must be the change that you wish to see in the world." Gandhi

                Comment

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